Doesn't matter if it's Army, Navy, Marines or whatever, a new study says that our military drink more than any other job in the U.S. I've been familiar with the military way of life since my brother joined the Marines when I was little. I saw the way he moved city to city, country to country, having to adjust to his new surroundings. The life of a soldier is different than any other profession out there, and many will never understand the difficulties they face doing their job and in their home life. Furthermore, even when they leave the military there are traits of the military life that stay with them forever. Take my first experience with the shower beer.

My former roommate is a veteran of the Air Force and once uploaded a photo of a beer outside of the shower with the caption "nothing like a shower beer in the morning." I had no idea what a shower beer was and asked him to please explain. My co-worker (also a veteran) looked shocked and asked me, "you've never had a shower beer?!" From what they explained to me, a shower beer is a beer that one enjoys while taking a shower. Pretty easy to understand, but apparently this was a common thing for them to enjoy when they were in the military. Other former military members I've talked to told me they have the same love for the shower beer and it is something they enjoyed while serving. I still haven't enjoyed a shower beer myself but I'm starting to think I should try one just to see what all the fuss is about.

A new analysis by Delphi Behavioral Health Group looked at data collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention regarding alcohol consumption. According to the Military Times, the CDC surveyed 27,000 people across 25 various professions and found that members of the armed services drank more days of the year than any other profession. From 2013 to 2017, military service members drank an average of 130 days a year. Not necessarily binge drinking, but having at least one drink on those 130 days. The average person drinks 91 days out of the year. Second and third place went to miners with 112 days of drinking and construction workers with 106 days. Seems like the country of Iceland should have read this report before the US military drank their beer supply dry in the Fall.