Sometime over the July 4th holiday weekend with the storms we had come thru-our Engineering staff is speculating that the 99.9 K-BAT transmitter site and tower were struck by lightning. That's when the "HUM" started on the air that you're hearing behind the music on the station's signal. I noticed the hum in the car that Saturday on a grocery store run for some charcoal and called our Engineer right away. So far they've combed thru all of our equipment at the site, had electricians out to re-ground everything electrical, and Oncor has even been out to install a new transformer that had fried in the strike... And the hum is STILL THERE.

Corporate Engineering is coming in next week to comb thru everything with our local guy and see what they can find-but now the thought is that it's something way up on the tower itself causing the 'hum'. I happened to be out on location at a broadcast with one of our sister stations Saturday the 3rd and ran into a few people that knew Either way--we'll keep on rockin' and playing the Basin's Classic Rock while they all try to figure it out. We just wanted YOU to know that we know it exists, and we're taking the steps and doing hat we can to eliminate it and get the station's sound back to where it used to be. We've gotten so many messages on facebook and via email, and some phone calls to also let us know about the 'hum'-and we appreciate each and every one of you for sticking with us while we work it out.

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