After LAST February 2021 and the week that stopped the world in Texas--we're all a bit wary of what's to come this year and if things do get bad, will the power grid survive and hold up thru it? As we went into winter last year, transitioning from Fall was pleasant and really gave no indication of cold weather to come. We had an extremely mild December, even hitting the 80's at Christmas. I know everyone's holding their breath to see what happens over the course of the next 6 weeks, but from what I can see in the Farmer's Almanac for our area-things are looking pretty good--if you believe that sort of thing. They do go back and look at their predictions after the fact to see how accurate they were, and usually, they are on target.

Get our free mobile app

According to their graph for West Texas-the coldest months this winter are one we've already been thru--November--and the one we are currently in--January. Temperatures dipping down below freezing in those months, along with minimal precipitation throughout. February shows zero precipitation and above normal temperatures all the way thru. So again, if you believe this is accurate then things look great for winter 2022. Last February (2021) was the 11th coldest on record for Texas. And the Almanac predicted that it would happen. So if this holds true and what they say--that we're supposed to have a warm February--turns to reality... Then I'll finally feel like I've experienced a winter in West Texas as it's supposed to be.

SEE THEIR PREDICTION GRAPH HERE.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

TIPS: Here's how you can prepare for power outages