For people who CAN go to their local polling locations, yes it is easy to vote in Texas, but when 1 in 8 mail-in ballots got thrown in the trash this past primary election for those who CAN'T make it to a polling location or easily get out of their car to go vote, that is the definition of voter suppression.

According to the Texas Tribune, thousands of mail-in ballots were rejected and almost 20,000 ballots were tossed in 16 counties with the most voters.

To put it in context, the normal rate before all the restrictions, like in the 2020 election is typically less than 1%.

With COVID in full force back in 2020, and some counties like Harris county allowing people to vote 24 hours a day as well as drive-thru voting, that showed that Texas used to be a low turnout state but it became a state that had a record turnout.

Some Republicans called that evidence of election fraud even though Republicans won all of the statewide elections and held on to or improved their numbers in the congressional delegation as well as the Texas Legislature.

So are Republicans saying that their win was fraudulent? Apparently so, but none of them will call off their win or ask for a recount even when Donald Trump won the state over Joe Biden by a 6 point margin.

There is no evidence of any kind of widespread election fraud in Texas or any of the other 49 states but Gov. Greg Abbott still put in place some of the most restrictive election laws in the country for a state that had no evidence of any voter fraud.

But the trashing of 23,000 votes after those new restrictions were put in place seems to be no cause for alarm to the people screaming the loudest about voter fraud.

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